Hepatitis C
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Information presented on this website is for educational purposes only.
Materials presented have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and are not meant as a replacement or substitute for professional medical diagnosis and treatment. Visitors are advised to seek professional medical care for any any disease or illness.
 


 

 

Articles by
Dr. Zhang
 
TCM and MCM Theory Related to Common Liver Disease Blood Test Markers

Low Dose Interferon Patient Experiment

Hepatitis A Prevention Reminder

Hepatitis: Causes of Pain in Liver Region 

The Need to Monitor Your Chronic Hepatitis

Liver Enzyme Fluctuation during Allergy Season 

What are the Serum Markers of Hepatitis B and What do They Mean?

Enterogenous Endotoxemia in Chronic Hepatitis–
Part 2

Enterogenous Endotoxemia in Chronic Hepatitis–
Part 1
 

Chronic Hepatitis and "Blood Activating and Stasis Expelling" (BASE) Therapy -
Part 2

Chronic Hepatitis and "Blood Activating and Stasis Expelling" (BASE) Therapy
Part 1

What Causes Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Liver Disease

Dietary Support for Cirrhotic Liver Diseases

Ascites - A Complication of De-Compensated Liver Cirrhosis

Liver Cirrhosis - Portal Vein Hypertension Complications

Liver Cirrhosis Overview

PG-IFN and Ribavirin Treatments

Antibiotics and Chronic Liver Diseases

Why is Alcohol Harmful for People with Hepatitis?

Co-infections and Super-infections of Viral Hepatitis

Beware of Medications That Can Cause Liver Damage

Bile Retention and Its Clinical Manifestations (MCM) part 4

Modern Chinese Medicine (MCM) Part 3 
Jaundice and Chronic Viral Hepatitis

Modern Chinese Medicine (MCM) Anti-Liver-Fibrosis Treatments - Part 2

Modern Chinese Medicine (MCM) Anti-Liver-Fibrosis Treatments - Part 1

What is Liver Fibrosis and How is It Different from Cirrhosis?

How does the liver change as we get older?

How is that my LFTs are so good when my viral load is seemly so high?

Comprehensive Care for Chronic Viral Hepatitis

What can Cause Liver Inflammation?  

What Are the Major Functions that the Liver Carries?


 

Liver Support with TCM
Liver Enzymes

This information is for educational purposes only.
Materials regarding herbs have not been evaluated by the
U.S. Food & Drug Administration and are not in any way a replacement or substitute for professional medical diagnosis and treatment. Persons with specific medical illnesses are advised to seek professional care.


ALT and AST elevation is an indication of liver cell damage or necrosis. The degree of elevation can also represent the severity of the liver inflammation. Generally, ALT and AST are good indicators for liver inflammation. Once inflammation is reduced, the progression of liver fibrosis can be held or even reversed. Thus, anti-inflammation therapy is effective anti-liver fibrosis treatment.

In cases of mild chronic persistent hepatitis, the level of these two enzymes is approximately 50% to 100% above the normal range (range is indicated by the testing facility, usually a number between 0 and 50). If they are elevated to three times or higher than the normal range, the inflammation is considered moderate or severe. In cases of acute hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis, ALT and AST levels can reach as high as 20 to 30 times the normal range. At those levels, the inflammation in the liver is involved with very active immune reactions and is often seen in autoimmune hepatitis and medication induced hepatitis cases. Because the immune system plays such a major role in the inflammatory process, treatment must not only focus on protecting the liver but also regulate immune reactions.

Sometimes liver enzyme levels are not always parallel with the severity of the liver inflammation. In the cirrhosis stage, when a biopsy indicates piecemeal necrosis (grade III to IV inflammation), enzymes could be in normal range or is only slightly elevated. This phenomenon is caused by the dramatic decrease in the total number of the liver cells. Even if highly inflamed, they are not producing enough enzymes to indicate inflammatory activity.

Anti liver inflammation herbal treatments can prevent liver cell degeneration, necrosis and bring ALT and AST level down to the normal range. The following herbs are commonly used to control liver inflammation and protect liver cells:

Wu Wei Zi (Schizandrae Fructus)
Gan Cao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis)
Shui Fei Ji (Silybum marianum)
Ku Shen (Sophorae Radix)
Chui Pen Cao (Sedi sarmentosi herba), Chai Hu (Bupleuri Radix)

The liver protective effects of these herbs have been tested by animal models and clinically in China. Modern Chinese medicine uses the more potent and stable isolated active ingredient compounds, such as Schisandrin, Glycyrrhizin, Silymarin, Oleanolic acid, Oxymatrine, and Saikosaponin A and D.

[Liu YL et al., Premary Discusion on the Use of Chinese Medicine According to Blood Tests, CJITWM, Jan 2003, 23(1):54-55]

 

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About HCV
Overview
Causes and Transmission

 
Diagnostic Tests
Antibody
HCV RIBA
HCV RNA 
Viral Load

Viral Genotyping

 
Major Signs
Liver Inflammation
Fibrosis
Cirrhosis

 
Peripheral Signs and Symptoms
Fatigue
Jaundice
Bile Retention
Joint Pains and Skin Rashes
Blood Sugar Instability
Portal Vein Hypertension
Ascites

 
Important Liver Function Test Markers
Overview
ALT and AST
ALP and GGT
Albumin
Bilirubin
PT (Prothrombin Time)
 
Liver Biopsy
Overview
Procedure
Inflammation Grade
Fibrosis Stage
 
Interferon Based Treatment
Overview
Ideal Candidate
Possible Side-effects
 
Liver Support with TCM
Overview
Liver Enzymes
Serum Albumin
Blood Clotting Factors
Bile metabolism
GGT
 
Dietary Considerations
Overview
Proteins
Essential Fats
Carbohydrates
Vitamins
 
 

 


 

 

Medical Information Sources:
http://www.nih.gov/
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/

http://nccam.nih.gov/
http://www.medlineplus.org/


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