Lyme Disease
Return Home
Information presented on this website is for educational purposes only.
Materials presented have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and are not meant as a replacement or substitute for professional medical diagnosis and treatment. Visitors are advised to seek professional medical care for any any disease or illness.
 

About Lyme Disease
Overview


Lyme disease is a bacterial spirochete (organism) transmitted by ticks. The name of the particular bacteria is Borrelia Burgdorferi.

Estimates state that only one out of every ten cases of Lyme disease is reported and that many people are misdiagnosed. Therefore, the 19,000 cases reported by the National Center for Infectious Disease (CDC) each year are more likely to be estimated at over 200,000 cases.

Lyme disease may be difficult to diagnose because many of its symptoms mimic those of other disorders. In addition, the only distinctive hallmark unique to Lyme disease, the "bulls eye" rash, is absent in almost half of the people who become infected. The inadequacies of today's laboratory tests make proper diagnosis difficult, and it can be extremely troublesome to treat the infection in its later phases.

Lyme disease can attack virtually any system in the body. Some of the first symptoms may include a flu-like condition, with fever, chills, headache, stiff neck, achiness, and fatigue. Other symptoms can include pain in various joints and muscles, neurological problems, heart involvement, problems with vision or hearing, migraines, low-grade fever or other symptoms. Lyme disease is often mistaken for other illnesses since the symptoms often mirror other medical problems, such as multiple sclerosis, arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, lupus or Alzheimer's disease. In the some cases, Lyme disease patients can become paralyzed and/or comatose. Lyme disease symptoms may come and go and be replaced by new symptoms. Symptoms may be subtle or pronounced



 

Return Home
About Lyme Disease
Overview
Causes and Transmission

Clinical Symptoms
Diagnosis
 
Treatment Strategies
Conventional Treatment
The Dilemma
Why Chinese Medicine

Spirochete Diseases in China and Modern Chinese Medicine
The Design of Comprehensive LD Treatment Strategy
 
Herxheimer's Reaction